STOP THE SCAN

STOP THE SCAN

CAMPAIGN TO STOP THE USE OF POLICE SCANNERS LINKED TO IMMIGRATION DATABASE
Today, The Racial Justice Network and Yorkshire Resists are launching the campaign STOP the SCANdal, calling on Police forces to halt the national rollout of mobile fingerprint scanners linked to the Home Office immigration database.
Racial Justice Network and Yorkshire Resists are calling on the police and the Home Office:
  • To end the racist stop and scan initiative immediately, before it irreparably damages relations between police and communities;
  • To sever all connections between police activity and immigration databases, to prevent the police becoming an extension of border forces;
  • To keep fingerprint scanning a step that only happens in police stations following arrest in order to protect citizen privacy rights and
  • To publicly release the data captured in the West Yorkshire pilot, including its impact on axes of race, age and gender.
The use of the scanners, which have been first...

Racism in schools parents circle

Racism in schools parents circle

Blurb from a parent.. The failure of the school to adequately address issues of racism filled me with fear and worry for how Black and Brown children are being treated in schools and resulted in me removing my child from a local  school.
Too often, such experiences of institutional racism within schools are shared by Black and Brown children and their families in our community. Racism throughout our education system, and in its varied forms, must be continually and collectively addressed to secure safer communities for Black and Brown children.
We invite you to come along to our first forum to discuss the experiences of Black and Brown children and families within schools, particularly around race and racism.
This meeting will take place on Thursday 18th April 2019 6-8pm Kids are welcome and light refreshments will be available.
This event is invitation only! Please email penny@racialjusticenetwork.co.uk for further...

Do we need more policing?

Do we need more policing?

In light of racialised state surveillance, state powers and (in)justice systems, do we need more policing? Police have recently undertaken a national rollout of mobile fingerprint scanners linked to the Home Office immigration databases, after a pilot in West Yorkshire. Even though the police have used fingerprinting technology for years, the direct link to the immigration database is brand new. Police have also been given more power around stop and search despite previous campaigns and pushback due to overrepresentation and targeting of Black and Brown communities. Recent reports on gang matrix, facial recognition, drones are leading most to question the amount of powers and surveillance and at the height of hostile environment, prevent and information sharing leaves many to question what this means for vulnerable, Black, Brown and migrant communities. Join us on the 30th of April 2019 for discussions about whether we need more policing and ways forward.

Christchurch massacre: a symptom of deep-rooted Islamophobia

Christchurch massacre: a symptom of deep-rooted Islamophobia

The Christchurch massacre is  a brutal and despicable act of terror. The targeted murder of 49 Muslims in two New Zealand mosques demonstrates the seriousness with which we must treat Islamophobia. In much of the subsequent media coverage and political ‘condemnation’, we can see a deliberate and dangerous attempt to omit that the victims were Muslim, that they were in a place of worship, and that this was an Islamophobic attack. However, as Asim Qureshi makes clear, we cannot and must not allow these events to be understood in abstraction from these fundamental factors. As Waqas Tufail puts it, ‘when Islamophobia and the threat of the far-right are not taken seriously, this is the outcome’. We should make no mistake about the severity of Islamophobia,...

Let Go of The Baby

Let Go of The Baby

As another Comic Relief approaches, now in it’s 33rd year, Black and Brown communities all over the UK brace ourselves for a narrative that presents us, our worlds and ancestries through a white, smug, self obsessed lens. As the Black film world rocks at yet another white saviour film has won an Oscar, sometimes we have to ask ourselves, what’s up with white peoples?   Why is it that stories not centring whiteness will shoe-horn it in at any cost? Why when this is pointed out by Black and Brown peoples isn’t there an ‘ok, sorry, we messed up’. From Driving Miss Daisy to The Help and Green Book, the white saviour trope holds so much traction that a white personality, holding a Black baby, displayed across the media and social media, under the guise of helping the unfortunate, incapable Black people is still something that becomes heavily debatable. Whiteness doesn’t  want to let go of the Black baby. It’s...

Charter Flights Crime

Charter Flights Crime

The way Black and Brown bodies are moved around is directly linked to the legacy of the Afrikan holocaust, chattel slavery. Our bodies are somehow disconnected from family, from love,  emotions and thought. This is one of the cornerstones of the ideology that allows bodies to be shipped, packed, unpacked, killed, discarded and dehumanised. This is what is happening now.  The deportation and treatment of our Elders has caused a scandal that the government is still keen to dodge. Our law abiding forebears deserved better. ‘Law abiding’ is the narrative that works, it holds currency as well as the public imagination. But people who have been labelled as criminal are not considered the ‘right’ kind of citizens. Our siblings are being deported on flights chartered by the government, and managed by security personnel (one need only look at the case of Jimmy Mubenga to see how this can end). It’s become a conveyor belt: an industry capitalising on the transportation of human flesh. The flights are conducted in secret, men and women dragged from registration centres and detained and then deported. There is no room for enquiry or to be...

Reflecting on 2018 and looking forward to 2019 at the Racial Justice Network

Reflecting on 2018 and looking forward to 2019 at the Racial Justice Network

2018 has been an eventful year for the Racial Justice Network and its been great to see the network go from strength to strength. We have been delighted to expand our board of trustees this year. Bringing a wealth of experience and expertise, Desiree Reynolds, Farzana Khan and Sipilien Birani have helped to consolidate and grow the work that we do at RJN.   We are also very pleased to have worked with many new members, friends and allied groups this year. We fondly remember hosting former Black Panther Kathleen Cleaver with the Northern Police Monitoring Project in Manchester, and another former Black Panther, Bob Brown in Leeds. [caption id="attachment_654" align="aligncenter" width="572"]Resisting racial injustice and policing [panel discussion at Kathleen Cleaver event: Katy Sian, Peninah...

Racial Justice Network statement on the unjust conviction of the Stansted 15

Racial Justice Network statement on the unjust conviction of the Stansted 15

Racial Justice Network statement on the unjust conviction of the Stansted 15   We at the Racial Justice Network are deeply troubled by the conviction of the Stansted 15 this week. We have to ask important questions about what this says of our ‘justice’ system, and wonder what implications such a decision has for the right to protest, and for human rights.   The UK immigration system is despicably cruel, and we stand in solidarity with the Stansted 15 and others who seek to oppose the ruthless injustice it produces. The Racial Justice Network has the utmost admiration for the heroic non-violent actions of the protesters. As a consequence of which, several of those threatened with deportation are pursuing, or have granted, permission to remain in the UK.     In light of this travesty of justice, we must redouble our efforts to dismantle borders, and make what should be an obvious point: no human being is illegal. We stand in solidarity with the Stansted 15.  

School Safe Spaces?

School Safe Spaces?

School Safe Spaces? In the last few days a video of a young Syrian boy being attacked and bullied has gone viral. Whilst there has been lots of media coverage, there has been little if any attempt to recognise this as a part of a continuing trend of Black, Brown, poor, Muslim and migrant children being attacked whilst they are in school and that this trend reflects society as a whole.   It points to a concern about popular and visible hatred of the ‘Other’ that transcends society from social media to the streets. It would be ludicrous not to associate these manifestations of racism with that perpetuated by the powerful: politicians and the media, and its larger manifestations in Brexit, Trumpism, and racist migration policies that take on a particular character within the context of the current Hostile Environment policy and the Windrush scandal. All of the above have populated and reinvigorated a new wave of nationalism and patriotism that has incubated a far-right narrative and sentiment. The likes of the EDL, Britain First, FLA, DFLA,...

holistic, economic, spiritual & cultural repairs to end racial injustice & address legacies of colonialism

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